5 Reasons to Pay Attention to our 2019 Research Symposium | BeyondCeliac.org
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5 Reasons to Pay Attention to our 2019 Research Symposium

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From updates on NexVax2 to better understanding gluten sensitivity, here are five great reasons to tune in to the 3rd Annual Celiac Disease Research Symposium

When Beyond Celiac hosts its third annual Research Symposium on May 30, 2019, in Philadelphia, three leading experts led by Beyond Celiac CSO and moderator Marie Robert, MD will share the latest news on celiac disease, a serious genetic autoimmune disease that damages the small intestine when gluten is ingested. The Symposium is presented by Beyond Celiac as part of its mission to advance research to find treatment options and, eventually, a cure for celiac disease, which affects one in 133 Americans.

There are many reasons to attend or tune in to the Symposium’s live webcast, but here are the top five:

  1. Get updates on Nexvax2, the first possible therapeutic vaccine for celiac disease that is currently going through a second round of testing worldwide. Joseph Murray, MD, of the Mayo Clinic will be discussing this and other current treatments for celiac disease in the drug development pipeline, including the results of recent clinical trials for larazotide acetate and latiglutenase.
  2. Stay informed. May is Celiac Awareness Month and an opportunity to learn more about this disease. Beyond Celiac reports that 83% of Americans with celiac disease are undiagnosed or misdiagnosed with other conditions. Celiac disease can also lead to a number of other disorders including infertility, reduced bone density, neurological disorders, some cancers, and other autoimmune diseases.
  3. Gain a better understanding of non-celiac gluten sensitivity, how it differs from celiac disease, and the steps to a proper diagnosis from Sonia Kupfer, MD, of the University of Chicago.
  4. What celiac disease patients want their treatments to look like should matter. That’s the focus of Pfizer’s Linda Deal, MS, who will discuss the importance of patient engagement in the drug development process, including how clinical trials should be designed with outcomes important to patients in mind.
  5. Understand how better diagnosis, advanced research and accelerated discovery of new treatments and a cure will help those affected by celiac disease as well as other autoimmune disorders. It’s estimated that 50 million Americans are living with autoimmune disease. Ongoing research has the potential to unlock the mystery of celiac disease and autoimmune diseases in general.

“We’re going to help unravel the mystery of non-celiac gluten sensitivity, including how to get a more definitive diagnosis rather than a diagnosis by ruling everything else out,” said Marie Robert, Beyond Celiac Chief Scientific Officer. “And we’re going to share how patients can really influence what new treatments on the horizon should look like. These are just some of the exciting things you can get the latest on through the symposium.”

Beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Gaulton Auditorium of the University of Pennsylvania’s Biomedical Research Building (421 Curie Boulevard in Philadelphia), the event is free and open to the public. Immediately following the event will be a complimentary reception featuring gluten-free snacks and desserts, sodas and wine.

The panel will answer questions submitted in advance from webcast viewers and from the audience. Register online for a link to the webcast or a free in-person ticket.

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