Gluten-Free: "Marketing Mind Trick" or Medical Need? | BeyondCeliac.org
X You may need to Reload the page to make it work correctly.

Gluten-Free: "Marketing Mind Trick" or Medical Need?

Article addresses reasons you should or shouldn't go gluten-free.

KSL.com recently addressed the rising popularity of gluten-free food and the question of gluten-free as “marketing mind trick” vs. medical need.

Four years ago, Karen Higgs was diagnosed with celiac disease. "Every time I would eat something, like toast or bread or a sandwich, it felt like needles were going through my stomach, like someone was taking a knife and chopping me inside,” she told KSL.com. At first, the diagnosis was a struggle, but increasing recognition and acceptance of gluten-free has made it easier, Higgs added.

"Celiac disease is the thing that the gluten-free diet was developed for, or what the treatment is," explained University of Utah Dietitian Julie Metos. "But it seems it's a really common thing for people to latch on to if they are not feeling well, or if they want to try the latest diet craze."

Metos doesn’t recommend the gluten-free diet for everyone, but said it’s a good way to explore other types of grains. She noted that many people who go gluten-free for the fad feel better because they’re eating healthier overall: adding fruits, vegetables and lean protein to their diet.

Although there is no harm in trying the gluten-free diet for yourself, it is always important to check and talk with a nutritionist, dietician, or your doctor, the article advised. Metos suggested another reason to think before you go gluten-free: “…you also don't want to pay a premium for something you don't really need or benefit from,” the article noted.

To read the full article, visit KSL.com

OUR SPONSORS & PARTNERS

Advertise with us

  • Gluten Detective
  • Look for the Beyond Celiac logo and shop gluten-free with confidence.
  • Gluten-Free Resource Directory


DO YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE CELIAC DISEASE?

Complete our Celiac Disease Symptoms Checklist today to find out if you could have celiac disease and how to talk to your doctor about getting tested.